10 Theories on the Sun Space

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In the near future, Earth could be faced with the threat of severe atmospheric activity, including solar explosions, near Earth asteroids, and geological anomalies. The Earth is currently traveling through the geological epoch known as the Holocene period. An epoch is a subdivision of the geologic timescale that is based on the study of rock layering. The Holocene began approximately 12,000 years ago and was preceded by the Pleistocene. The end of an epoch is characterized by extreme climate change and mass extinction. During Earth’s transition into the Holocene, the planet experienced the Quaternary extinction and the Younger Dryas global climate cooling event. Modern research conducted at the Russian Antarctic Vostok Station has suggested that we may soon be reaching the end of the Holocene. This was determined by studying the layers of the Earth’s crust through the process of massive ice core drilling. This revelation is a bit concerning with the current global climate disruption we are experiencing on Earth.

Everyone is familiar with the current 2012 doomsday predictions. In December of 2012, the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, which was used by several Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures, will reach the end of its 13th baktun. People have predicted that this indicates that a massive geological event will occur on Earth. This article will be examining some theories surrounding the sun, space and the 2012 severe weather patterns. Put yourself in the place of a high level government official. If you had direct information that a cataclysmic event was approaching Earth, would you suppress it from the public or announce it? The obvious answer is to hide it and secretly prepare for a response.

Holocene Impact Working Group

Tunguska Event Trees

The Holocene Impact Working Group is a collection of scientists from Australia, France, Ireland, Russia and the US, who hypothesize that meteorite impacts on Earth are more common than previously supposed. The group has suggested that the Earth experiences one large global impact every 1,000 years. They claim that the geological formation known as a chevron or a wedge-shaped sediment deposit observed on coastlines, are created by megatsunamis and asteroid impacts. This idea is controversial because other scientists proclaim that there have not been enough large impacts and landslides to explain all the observed chevrons in the world. The Impact Working Group understands that their research contradicts much of what is understood about impacts and tsunamis. However, they have gathered some significant results and located major impact zones on Earth. The most important being the Burckle Crater, which is an undersea crater located to the east of Madagascar and west of Western Australia in the southern Indian ocean. The position of the impact crater was found by the Working Group, based on evidence of prehistoric chevron dune formations in Australia and Madagascar.

The impact zone is very large and estimated to be about 30 km (18 mi) in diameter. The Burckle Crater has yet to be dated by radiometric analysis, but it is strongly believed that the object impacted Earth between the years 2800-3000 BC, which is only 5,000 years ago. Numerous cultures make references to an ancient flood during this time in history and a wide range of events point to a disaster on Earth, including the end of the Early Harappan Ravi Phase, the end of the pre-dynastic “antediluvian” rulers of the Sumerian civilization, the start of the First Dynasty of Kish, and the pre-Xia dynasty rule of the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors of China. In 2003, another impact zone was revealed off the New Zealand continental shelf. It has become known as Mahuika Crater. The impact zone is over 20 kilometers (12.5 mi) wide and over 153 meters deep. The findings are extremely interesting considering the fact that, around the year 1400, the natives of New Zealand totally abandoned their southern coastal settlements. The event has historically been attributed to an earthquake induced tsunami, but no specific earthquake could be identified. The Mahuika Crater explains the signs of megatsunamis in this area of the world. The massive crater has been dated to around 1443 A.D., which is only 567 years ago. Earth’s most recent encounter with a meteoroid or comet is known as the Tunguska event. In 1908, a large explosion was recorded near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in Russia.

The blast was measured at between 15-30 megatons of TNT. It was equivalent to the Castle Bravo thermonuclear bomb, tested on March 1, 1954, or about 1,000 times as powerful as the atomic bombs dropped during World War II. The explosion demolished an estimated 80 million trees over 2,150 square kilometers (830 sq mi). The Tunguska event is believed to have been caused by the near air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometers (3.1–6.2 mi) above the Earth’s surface, meaning that the comet never actually impacted Earth. It is generally believed that the object was approximately 20-40 meters (65-131 feet) across, which is clearly much smaller than the Burckle and Mahuika meteorites. The Tunguska event is the largest impact event over land in Earth’s recent history. However, all Impacts of a similar size over remote ocean areas would have gone unnoticed before the advent of global satellite monitoring in the 1960s and 1970s. In 2002, The B612 Foundation was developed. The B612 is a private foundation dedicated to protecting the Earth from asteroid strikes. Their immediate goal and mission statement is to “significantly alter the orbit of an asteroid in a controlled manner by 2015.”

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